head copy.jpg
head copy.jpg
head.jpg
head.jpg
head.jpg
head.jpg
head.jpg
head copy.jpg

Food & Drink


SCROLL DOWN

Food & Drink


head copy.jpg

Say Cheese


Though many aren’t aware, there are some fantastic cheeses being aged in Hong Kong – we get two experts’ picks of what’s perfect to close out the summer

Say Cheese


Though many aren’t aware, there are some fantastic cheeses being aged in Hong Kong – we get two experts’ picks of what’s perfect to close out the summer

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Say Cheese

August 25, 2017 / by Louis-Marie Delmas

 


For several years, a number of French cheesemakers have been taking advantage of an efficient logistics network, exporting their raw milk products to meet the growing demand from restaurants and local consumers. Now, two of these fromagers-affineurs have taken the pioneering step of ripening their cheeses right here in Hong Kong. Jérémy Evrard (of the soon-to-open J’s Bar Bistro at the Royal Garden Hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui) and Thierry Rochas Dupérier (La Fromagerie in Central) select cheeses from small-scale European producers, bring them to the city and work their magic to turn them into matured masterpieces. Here, each man tells us what he would put on his ideal cheese platter for six people as summer winds down. 

Thierry Rochas Dupérier.jpg

“My end-of-summer cheese platter would be like a tour of Europe, with cheeses ranging from the mildest to the strongest, from France and bordering cheesemaking countries. So there would be a hand-ladled raw milk camembert made by Gaslonde, one of the best cheesemakers in Normandy. Then there would be an artisanal raw milk Reblochon and a Rove des Garrigues, which is a fresh goat’s cheese that has a subtle thyme flavour, because the goats roam freely in the Provençal scrublands – it’s a favourite of mine. The famous Tête de Moine from Switzerland has a graphic aspect – the little flower shapes made by the “girolle” cheese-cutter will look beautiful on the platter. And to end this cheese-tasting journey through Europe, an Italian parmesan.”

—Thierry Rochas Dupérier

Thierry Rochas Dupérier_cheese.jpg

 

“As summer draws to an end, cheeses from the mountain pastures appeal to me the most. So I’d select a Brillât-Savarin, a Saint-Nectaire, a Comté, a Manigodine, a farm-produced Époisses and a slice of Fourme d’Ambert.”

—Jérémy Evrard

Jérémy Evrard.jpg

Images: Courtesy of Jérémy Evrard and Thierry Rochas Dupérier

Back to top

head copy.jpg

Valley Views


Simon Field, a Master of Wine and a buyer for Berry Bros & Rudd, discusses the Rhône Valley’s excellent 2015 vintage

Valley Views


Simon Field, a Master of Wine and a buyer for Berry Bros & Rudd, discusses the Rhône Valley’s excellent 2015 vintage

Lifestyle > Food & Drink



Valley Views

June 30, 2017 / by Simon Field

above illustration: ©Berry Bros & Rudd

The wines of 2015 are a gold-plated triumph for both ends of the Rhône Valley. Early plaudits favoured the north and reds over whites, but the empirical evidence has underlined a rare uniformity of excellence. The reds perhaps prevailed, but only because of a climate that was almost too benevolent and which, on occasion, undermined acidity levels (in Viognier, for example). This vintage is a rare coincidence of quality and quantity.

Indeed, despite the relatively small berries and impressively thick skins, the superb finesse of the tannins really marks out this vintage. When asked to compare, vignerons in the south cited 2007 and 2010, while in the north, the most common comparisons were 2009 and 2010, with the consensus praising a style somewhere in the middle. 

For the wines of the south, what one needs to avoid is too much of a good thing – too much sun and the danger of desiccated and sunburnt fruit, with alcohol levels creeping over 15 degrees and natural acidity that’s far too low. Such indulgence was avoided in 2015 as a result of two natural phenomena, both of which are often absent: first, the relatively wet spring, which topped up the water table; and, second, the unusually cool nights in the hottest part of the year, which delayed the process just enough to ensure physiological ripeness and sugar levels that weren’t excessive.

Read More

The heat was actually more pronounced earlier in the summer, with late June and early July being particularly scorching, contributing to an average mean temperature over the total growing season that was higher even than 2003. However, the mitigating factors rehearsed above were sufficiently significant to change the profile of the 2015 vintage, thus ensuring a lengthy and – to borrow a word much in currency with the vignerons when describing 2015 – “easy” season.

Easy is as easy does, and few things are, in reality, that simple in modern winemaking. The philosophy of so-called “minimal intervention” is very hard to achieve, after all – like drawing a perfect circle, free-hand. What looked to be a late year was soon revised towards an early picking date and then, with the relatively mild August, a “normal” harvest date. The early whites were picked in the middle of September and the late grapes, significantly mourvèdre, were all brought in by the end of the first week of October.

It’s a good-to-very-good vintage for whites across the piece and an excellent vintage for reds, with Côte-Rôtie and Hermitage particularly successful in the north. The southern vineyards were uniformly impressive, from the higher sites in Gigondas and Vinsobres through to the Crau plateau of Châteauneuf-du-Pape. Very few 2015s actually touched 15 degrees, even down here. Harmony and balance, a Socratic ideal – who could wish for more?

Back to top

head.jpg

The Joys of Rosé


Consulting oenologist and wine estate owner Michel Rolland crafts wines for more than 150 wineries in 14 countries. This includes France – where he works with Château l’Évangile, Château Figeac, Château La Conseillante and Château Pavie, to name a few – Italy, Spain, the United States (where his clients include Harlan Estate, Staglin and Screaming Eagle), South Africa, Argentina, Chile, India and China.  

In addition to this, the 10 oenologists working in Rolland’s Pomerol laboratory analyse wines for more than 400 French wine estates.  Just in time for summer, the Bordeaux-based “Flying Winemaker” shares the secrets of rosé.

The Joys of Rosé


Consulting oenologist and wine estate owner Michel Rolland crafts wines for more than 150 wineries in 14 countries. This includes France – where he works with Château l’Évangile, Château Figeac, Château La Conseillante and Château Pavie, to name a few – Italy, Spain, the United States (where his clients include Harlan Estate, Staglin and Screaming Eagle), South Africa, Argentina, Chile, India and China.  

In addition to this, the 10 oenologists working in Rolland’s Pomerol laboratory analyse wines for more than 400 French wine estates.  Just in time for summer, the Bordeaux-based “Flying Winemaker” shares the secrets of rosé.

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

The Joys of Rosé

June 30, 2017 / by Pierre Godeau

Is rosé really the wine of summer? 

Definitely. Rosés are wines for the sun-filled weekends and summer holidays. But people are gradually realising that they’re a pleasure to drink all year round.

Are there different types of rosé? Which varietals are most commonly used?

There are numerous types of rosé. In France, Provence is the best-known region, with varietals like cinsault, rolle, grenache and syrah. But there are also rosés made from pinot, cabernet sauvignon and other types of grapes. 

Are there outstanding rosés in the same way that there are for reds and whites? What are the most famous rosé wines?

The quality of the Provence rosés has improved in the past few years, so they’ve acquired a reputation for excellence. In terms of name recognition, they dominate this market today.

Read More

Are rosés good wines for laying down in a cellar? 

I don’t think rosés are made for that. Even so, everyone has come across a bottle that they had more or less forgotten about – and then greatly enjoyed drinking it. 

How do you choose a rosé? How is a quality rosé recognised?

That’s a difficult question. Rosés aren’t ranked the way grands crus are. You buy a rosé; it’s not that expensive; you drink it and find out if you like it. If you don’t, then you buy a different one next time.

As an oenologist, do you often create rosé wines for the estates you work with? 

Of course – rosés are in fashion, and besides that, I drink them myself. 

What’s special about a Bordeaux rosé and how is it different from a clairet?

Rosés used to be the byproducts of red wine production in Bordeaux. Now rosés are crafted – and they have become very good. Clairet has existed for a long time in Bordeaux – the historical legacy of the English presence in Aquitaine. Clairet de Quinsac is an institution.

Do the Chinese produce rosé? 

They have only just started to; I don’t have any good examples of Chinese rosé. But the varietals and the climate are genuinely favourable to producing rosé. 

What foods does rosé go well with?   

It goes well with almost all cuisines – that’s its great advantage. 

What are your five favourite rosés? 

I’m friends with all of the rosé producers – and I’d rather keep it that way!

Back to top

head.jpg

Shake it Up


“I’d like a cheeseburger, large fries and a Cosmo, please”

Shake it Up


“I’d like a cheeseburger, large fries and a Cosmo, please”

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Shake it Up

June 30, 2017 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

In the beloved TV series Sex and the City, protagonist Carrie Bradshaw famously paid tribute to her love of New York City and the Cosmopolitan cocktail. This summer, do her one better and try it yourself – it’s easy to look like a cocktail pro with our picks below. 

Millefiori Jug, Karma Living.jpg

Millefiori Jug, Karma Living

Pour juice or ice water from this pretty jug – it makes your fruit-based cocktails taste that much sweeter. Don’t believe it? Try making a piña colada, blue Hawaiian or mai tai.

Tropical Cocktail Kit, Sunnylife

Bring this colourful cocktail kit to your beach party and you’ll have everything you need to make some festive cocktails for six people: a shaker, six coasters, six watermelon-shaped ice cubes, six umbrellas, six straws, six stirrers and three drink recipes.

Floating Cooler, BigMouth Inc

Wonder how to keep your drinks close-by when you’re in the pool? This pink flamingo floating cooler helps to hold five drinks while you can also store more bottles and cans with ice in the central bucket.

The Shaker, Odeme

Experiment with your recipes using this glossy, gold-toned cocktail shaker – it’ll definitely make your drinks more stylish.

Cocktail of Choice-The Aviation.jpg

Cocktail of Choice: The Aviation

2 oz gin liqueur
½ oz Maraschino
½ oz lemon juice
¼ oz crème de violette 

head.jpg

You Scream, I Scream…
Ice Cream!


Summer is a season many of us love to hate. It’s blisteringly hot and leaves us covered in sweat, but it also lets us indulge our pleasures for the chilly, sweet wonder that is ice cream. Check out some of the coolest spots in town

You Scream, I Scream…
Ice Cream!


Summer is a season many of us love to hate. It’s blisteringly hot and leaves us covered in sweat, but it also lets us indulge our pleasures for the chilly, sweet wonder that is ice cream. Check out some of the coolest spots in town

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

You Scream, I Scream… Ice Cream!

June 30, 2017 / by Wang Yuke

Tezukuri no Mise

Particularly popular with youngsters and with queues a common sight, Tezukuri no Mise is known for its low prices and hefty serving sizes. The scoop is satisfyingly big at no more than HK$20, and the texture and taste are almost as good as premium ice creams, if you aren’t a hyper-critical connoisseur. The Japanese green tea, black sesame and chocolate chip flavours are recommended. You can also venture to try the tofu flavour, which could be an acquired taste for some – but we’d guess you’ll take to this soy milk-like treat. 

Where to eat

Numerous branches, including 11/F, Langham Place, 8 Argyle Street, Mong Kok


Passion by Gerard Dubois 

You’ll be naturally drawn in by the cabinet display of colourful gelato at Passion by Gerard Dubois. The numerous flavour choices include some rare ones, such as Toblerone chocolate, Snickers candy bar and avocado. For those struggling to choose, the hazelnut and cookie flavours are the go-to options. The former has a strong fragrance of hazelnuts, which tastes natural and not artificial, while the latter will please you with its crunches of Oreo cookie crumbs generously embedded within.  

Where to eat

Numerous branches, including Shop G12, G/F, Lee Garden One, 33 Hysan Avenue, Causeway Bay

Read More

2/3 Dolci

The sea salt caramel ice cream offered by 2/3 Dolci may bring you to the shocking realisation that ice cream can be salty – and that the saltiness makes the ice cream even creamier. The caramel is rich and creamy, while the salty note running through the first bite to the finish intensifies the flavours, making the scoop that much more buttery. You’ll be reminded of lounging on the beach and breathing in the briny air. 

Where to eat

Shop 110, L1, Pacific Place, Admiralty


Yo Mama

If you dread putting extra fat on your waistline but still want a chilly fix, nothing’s better than yoghurt ice cream or frozen yoghurt. You can create your own yoghurt tub by choosing the size, flavours and toppings. Dozens of toppings are available, including fresh fruit slices; colourful embellishments such as gummy bears, fruity poppers and mochi; and crunchy treats such as nuts, candied cereals and chocolate M&Ms. The iced yoghurt is light and refreshing, quenching your thirst as well as your craving for dessert. 

Where to eat

Numerous branches, including Shop 1061, IFC Mall, Podium Level 1, Central


head.jpg

Detox for Summer


Prepare a detox water bottle according to our tasty recipes – they’re easy to make, deliciously healthy and oh-so photogenic

Detox for Summer


Prepare a detox water bottle according to our tasty recipes – they’re easy to make, deliciously healthy and oh-so photogenic

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Detox for Summer

June 30, 2017 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

Instead of drinking plain old water, “detox water” can get you all the good stuff from H2O for your body and a lot more – and it’ll be super-tasty, too. Used as part of your daily regimen or as a method of nutrition replenishment during a detox session, what are you waiting for? But before you jump into it, there’s an unmissable pre-step. Get a beautiful glass bottle or pitcher and you’ll have that much more motivation to stick to your routine. 

Steps

Step 1 – Select the fruit(s).

Recommendations: 

Strong

Lemon/lime
Orange
Grapefruit
Pineapple
Cucumber

Mild

Watermelon
Strawberry
Kiwi

Step 2 – Select the herbs or other side ingredients to add flavour.

Recommendations: 

Mint leaves
Parsley
Cinnamon sticks
Ginger root
Honey
Himalayan salt

Step 3 – Add the fluid(s).

Water

Other recommendations:

Green tea
Coconut water
Apple cider vinegar (diluted with water)

 

Step 4 – Refrigerate.

Refrigerate your pitcher with all the selected ingredients for anywhere from three hours to overnight, depending on how strong you want the flavours to be.

Our Recipes

Pineapple Lime Detox Water

A bowl of pineapple wedges and a lemon cut into wedges
Juice of 2 whole limes
Some fresh parsley leaves
Water 


Apple Cider Vinegar Detox Drink

 Juice of half a lemon
1 cinnamon stick
1 teaspoon of honey
2 teaspoons of organic apple cider vinegar (diluted in water)


head.jpg

South Asian Treats


Three Indian-inspired recipes based on yoghurt and spices

South Asian Treats


Three Indian-inspired recipes based on yoghurt and spices

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

South Asian Treats

June 30, 2017 / by China Daily Lifestyle Premium

A great cooling food for the summer, live yoghurt is extremely nutritious and helps keep your gut bacteria healthy. Recent research from Osteoporosis International has also concluded that the habitual consumption of yoghurt could lead to stronger bones. But if you want to try something besides eating directly out of the container, check out our Indian-inspired recipes for some tasty ideas. 

Read More

Raita

This mint and cucumber raita recipe is a classic. Simply mix all the ingredients together; you can eat it on its own, or serve it with breads and various other dishes. 

1 cup natural yoghurt
½ cup cucumber, grated or chopped
3 teaspoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 teaspoons chopped green onions
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
Pinch of salt (season to taste)


Lassi

A blended drink of yoghurt, milk, fruit and some light spices, the mango cardamom lassi delivers natural sweetness. Mix all the ingredients with a spoon or in a blender to achieve a smoother texture.

1 cup natural yoghurt
1 cup chopped ripe mango
½ cup milk
Pinch of ground cardamom
1 to 2 teaspoons honey
Some ice (optional) 


Chaas

Also known as “Indian buttermilk”, this masala chaas has a stronger taste with various spices added; it’s also good for digestion due to the addition of kala namak (Himalayan black salt). 

1 cup natural yoghurt
¾ teaspoon kala namak (black salt)
¾ teaspoon chaat masala (spice blend)
3 teaspoons fresh mint leaves
2 cups chilled water
1 small green chilli, chopped (optional)


head copy.jpg

Summer Gastronomy


With two Michelin stars under his belt, Fabrice Vulin has just taken over as executive chef at top French restaurant The Tasting Room in Macau. He shares his recipe for a summer favourite

Summer Gastronomy


With two Michelin stars under his belt, Fabrice Vulin has just taken over as executive chef at top French restaurant The Tasting Room in Macau. He shares his recipe for a summer favourite

Lifestyle > Food & Drink


 

Summer Cuisine

May 26, 2017 / by Louis-Marie Delmas

What summer ingredients do you use most? 

Courgettes and tomatoes. You can deep-fry flowering courgettes in batter, bake, sauté, purée, chop them in a salad with mint – so many possible combinations. Likewise, there are so many things you can do with tomatoes: mousses, jellies, cold in a salad or cooked. 

What’s today’s recipe? 

Razor clams and cockles. You can serve this as a light first course or before dinner with drinks – it goes well with a glass of rosé, for example.

Read More

Ingredients

Razor clams and cockles on a leaf of soy-lime jelly

 

For the jelly:

20cl sweet soy sauce, 1 unwaxed lime, 2g agar-agar

For the shellfish topping:

1kg cockles, 1kg razor clams

For assembly and garnish:

1 unwaxed orange, 5cl olive oil, 150g coarse salt, a few sprigs of chervil and Thai basil, dill

 

Recipe

To make the jelly

Put the soy sauce, 5cl of water, the zest of the lime and half of its juice in a saucepan. Add the agar-agar. Bring to a boil over low heat, whisking. Pour the hot jelly onto a tray lined with cling film, spreading it to a thickness of about 2mm. Refrigerate. 

To make the shellfish topping

Clean the cockles in several changes of cold water. Heat a pot (no oil) and arrange the cockles in it. Allow them to open naturally, stirring with a spoon. Spread out on a tray, remove the flesh and refrigerate. Do the same with the razor clams, keeping only the firm white flesh. Save 12 shells after cleaning them to remove all grit and sand. 

To assemble

Cut the soy-lime jelly into strips the same size as the razor clam shells and line each shell with a strip of jelly. On each shell, delicately alternate pieces of razor clam meat and cockle meat, covering the shell completely. Grate the orange zest into the olive oil and garnish each assembled razor clam with a few drops. Decorate each one with the sprigs of chervil and basil, and add a generous grinding of pepper.

Dampen the coarse salt with a little water, add a bit of chopped dill and cut out four little round bases (diameter approximately the length of a razor clam shell). Place three of the assembled razor clams on each base. Chill and serve.

A tip from the chef:

Different types of shellfish can be added according to the season: littleneck clams, cherrystone clams, mussels or scallops.

Back to top