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On a Culinary Mission: David Yeo of Aqua


On the eve of the Aqua Restaurant Group’s 15th anniversary, the outspoken restaurateur is looking ahead to further global expansion

On a Culinary Mission: David Yeo of Aqua


On the eve of the Aqua Restaurant Group’s 15th anniversary, the outspoken restaurateur is looking ahead to further global expansion

Culture > Food & Drink


On a Culinary Mission

December 22, 2015 / by Constance Shen

On the eve of the Aqua Restaurant Group’s 15th anniversary, the outspoken restaurateur David Yeo is looking ahead to further global expansion.

We know you’re Singapore-born and that you got your start as a lawyer in London. But it seems that Hong Kong is Aqua’s home.

Well, I’ve lived in Hong Kong longer than anywhere else – it’s also my home.  

As the founder and creative director of Aqua, what has changed over the past 15 years?

I’m very lucky; it’s a creative job. What I do is no different than Giorgio Armani, who has a whole team of designers. I’m sure he doesn’t design every outfit. But he would say, “This design is within Armani’s guidelines” – the look and feel of an Armani creation. We are trying to do the same. My big passion now – I think everybody is catching on to it – is Spanish cuisine. It actually started with a glass of white in a bleak part of Spain. I was no longer limited to French and Italian grapes. I felt like a child that’d been given a box of pencils in colours he’d never seen before. 

How have your customers evolved over time?

It wasn’t so long ago that people were drinking Château Lafite with Coke. Now they’re moving away from Bordeaux. They’re more knowledgeable and are asking intelligent questions, such as “What’s the mix of grapes in this?” This is the level of sophistication of our Chinese customers today. 

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Does that bring you greater challenges?

We’re always ahead of them. I never let my customers lead me. I show them what may be interesting to try. I think I would be in big trouble if they were telling me what I should be doing next. You don’t want to ring the doorbell and tell Mr Armani what he should be designing next season.

Is the idea of casual dining the diametrical opposite of fine dining?

In my humble opinion, fine dining has never had mass appeal, maybe because in the old days, it was highly formalised and you had to dress up for it. The cost is so high and you don’t want to dine like that every month. It was more of a celebration. These days, people take the concept of excellent food and they want to see it packaged in different ways. We do two things: first, casual dining, which is Shiro and Tivo, and then lifestyle dining, which is Armani Aqua – these go together. 

Could you share Aqua’s formula for success?

I don’t know whether I have a formula, but above all I don’t believe I could do it without my team. The other thing is to listen to your customers because you cannot dictate with every creative job. For example, in London, we tried to tone down the level of spiciness – but if it gets to a ridiculous point, we’d rather not serve the dish, because it would no longer be our food.

With the criticism you faced at the London launch of Aqua Kyoto and Aqua Nueva, how did you bring the business back on track?

I would say if you really know what you’re doing, you won’t be writing for a living – you’ll be starting a restaurant. They really pronounced their judgement on us straight away; before they’d even stepped inside, they had decided they wouldn’t like us. It was difficult for our staff when critics commented that if it was such a good restaurant, it wouldn’t need to hire such attractive girls – that almost brought our girls to the point of tears. I found it difficult to forgive. But within nine months, guests were queuing down the road to get in.

It has been said it’s the unconventional decor, rather than the food or drink, that gives Aqua’s restaurants their buzz.
I don’t do unconventional design. I do completely conventional stuff – but it’s how you do it that matters, though. I won two national awards last year – one for lighting and another, in the UK, for bar design. 

As an example, Tivo in Kennedy Town looks like a New York warehouse. 

Also, in the London building where we opened Hutong, there was a sort of suction device in the structure directly above the restaurant. This design issue meant that many businesses weren’t interested in leasing the space, but I actually made it my bar. 

What’s next for you and for Aqua?

The 15th anniversary marks something of a watershed. It will see us expand considerably on a global scale. And it will be slightly different as we push forward – the reason being that we have a hub-and-spoke approach. The hub is like an incubator, where we start nurturing our next generation of managers and chiefs. We don’t only hire locally, so all the managers leading the expansion will have been with us for some time.

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The Perfect Pair: Matching Wine and Food


A Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd’s wine education specialist, Anne McHale, explores the art of matching wine with food – is there a science behind it?

The Perfect Pair: Matching Wine and Food


A Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd’s wine education specialist, Anne McHale, explores the art of matching wine with food – is there a science behind it?

Culture > Food & Drink



The Perfect Pair

above illustration: © Berry Bros.

December 22, 2015 / by Anne McHale / Illustration: Billy Wong

 

Food and wine matching is a fascinating subject – especially when it comes to the research. But there are as many strongly held opinions on this topic as there are pairings. Some will argue that it is a science, and by knowing the rules and following them to the letter you are much more likely to achieve a harmonious match. Those at the other end of the spectrum may say that it is more of an art form. In other words, trust your instincts and get creative.

But which is it? As a wine educator at Berry Bros & Rudd, I have been privileged to spend many years exploring this intriguing subject. My views tend to fall somewhere in the middle. However, there is indeed a certain set of rules that, if followed, will help you avoid clashes and will increase the chances of finding a harmonious match. These can be summarised as follows:

 

PAIRINGS THAT WORK

  • Full-bodied wines with rich food
  • Light-bodied wines with delicate food
  • Tannic red wines with high-protein food Aged wines with savoury (umami) food
  • Complementary flavours

 

PAIRINGS TO AVOID

  • Very dry wines with sweet food
  • Low-acidity wines with high-acidity food
  • Tannic red wines with low-protein food Full-bodied wines with a light, subtle dish
  • Light-bodied wines with a full, rich dish

 

However, this doesn’t take into account our individual preferences. Anyone who has been on a wine course will know that every student in the room has a different take on each wine tasted. And it’s certainly no wonder – we all have different palates, different sensory experiences, and different likes and dislikes. The same applies to food and wine matching. The above points will guide you, but there is also an entire dimension beyond – and this is where the artistic side comes in. 

The final point above is perhaps the most flexible of the “rules” – and the one where you can really get creative. Pair a sauvignon blanc with asparagus, try an oaky chardonnay with an oak-smoked salmon, or match barbecued meat with a smoky, rich shiraz. 

If you prefer, you can also let the food’s flavours take the lead and shine through by pairing it with a more neutral wine, such as a crisp, minerally Gavi from northwest Italy.

These are just a few examples so you get the general idea. My suggestion when pairing is to keep the key rules in mind, but remember that everyone you enjoy food and wine with will have a slightly different take on the best matches. The final word that sums it all up – and let’s face it, there are worse things to do in life – is experiment!

For those who want to learn more, check out Berry Bros & Rudd’s new book, Exploring & Tasting Wine, which is now available in Hong Kong. (www.bbr.com)

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Pies in the Sky: Aaron Claxton of Cathay Pacific


Cathay Pacific catering manager Aaron Claxton on air food

Pies in the Sky: Aaron Claxton of Cathay Pacific


Cathay Pacific catering manager Aaron Claxton on air food

Culture > Food & Drink



Pies in the Sky

December 22, 2015

Cathay Pacific catering manager Aaron Claxton discusses the advancements in airline cuisine.

What have been the greatest changes over the last 20 years when it comes to airline food? 

From a technical aspect, things haven’t evolved that much in the onboard kitchens and the way food is delivered to passengers.
But with many people adopting more healthy dining habits nowadays, we are trying to use more herbs for a natural flavour, cutting down on the use of sugar and salt, and using more vegetables in our in-flight meals.

We seem to have reached a point where the only way to enhance the food experience in the air is to have a top chef making it in the cabin. 

Having a chef aboard an aircraft sounds like a nice touch, but the ability to cook food in the air is extremely limited due to space and equipment limitations, and the safety requirements of regulators. 

In essence, a flying chef would be able to plate up a dish to restaurant standards, but this would be limited to premium passengers. There is significant value in working with talented chefs at the cutting edge of trends and the use of new ingredients, though, and this is a direction we are taking to develop and enhance the food experience. 

In-flight food is always subject to the restrictions of altitude. What can you do to further improve things?

For one, Cathay Pacific is using state-of-the-art equipment such as automatic braising machines to streamline the production of congee, stews and rice dishes. 

What’s the hardest dish to do well in the air? 

Among the cooking that doesn’t work well is fried food. High-fat dishes such as battered fish tend to go soggy once heat is applied and aren’t suitable for serving in-flight. Some foods are highly suited, though, such as stews and curries.

Since the atmosphere affects our taste buds, could the role of neurogastronomy come into play at some point?

Adding sensory experiences such as listening to music has proven to enhance the way some food tastes. So people eating in isolation with an in-flight movie or music playing in their ears – who knows how this will develop in the future?

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Vine-ally: Vinexpo Hong Kong


Biennial trade show Vinexpo Hong Kong puts Italy in the spotlight

Vine-ally: Vinexpo Hong Kong


Biennial trade show Vinexpo Hong Kong puts Italy in the spotlight

Culture > Food & Drink



Vine-ally...

December 22, 2015

Narrowly edging out France in 2015 as the world’s largest wine producer by volume, Italy is home to some of the oldest vineyards on the planet. From pinot grigio to the famed Super Tuscans, Italian wines are globally renowned for their quality and sheer variety. The country’s wine exports have grown substantially in recent years as well.

To recognise the country’s excellence in winemaking, Vinexpo, the organiser of international wine and spirits shows throughout Europe and Asia, will make Italy its guest of honour at the upcoming Hong Kong instalment in May.

Aside from the chance to meet a wide variety of distributors and winemakers from around the world, Vinexpo attendees can expect a diverse programme packed with tastings, talks and panel sessions.

Asia is increasingly becoming a focal point for wine exports. “In just a few years, Asia has become the main growth driver for wine and spirits consumption globally,” says Guillaume Deglise, the CEO of Vinexpo. “The Asian continent already accounts for 11% of global wine consumption and 63% of spirits consumption. Its growth prospects for the next five years are five times higher than the rest of the world.”

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Growing Up: Champagne


Simon Field of Berry Bros & Rudd (BBR), who is a Master of Wine and has been with the merchant since 1998, explores the wide world of Champagne

Growing Up: Champagne


Simon Field of Berry Bros & Rudd (BBR), who is a Master of Wine and has been with the merchant since 1998, explores the wide world of Champagne

Culture > Food & Drink



Growing Up

above illustration: © Berry Bros.

November 20, 2015 / by Simon Field / Illustration: Billy Wong

 

The world of Champagne is changing – slowly, gradually and discretely, I grant you, – but definitely for the better, very much like many of its wines. A glorious fizzy paradox dictates that the hegemony hitherto enjoyed by the big houses has persisted in Champagne for far longer than in other regions – Burgundy being the most obvious and nearest example, mainly because the quality of its wines has been so good. As a consequence, the growers themselves have, for a variety of reasons, been happy to sell their grapes to the Moëts and Laurent-Perriers of this world, gleaning a degree of vicarious satisfaction from the fact that the end product will be well presented, well marketed and, in general, very pleasant to drink. The premium in pricing that 

champagne has had over its global sparkling competitors for so long means two things: first, a very agreeable living and second, land prices that ensure a more than satisfactory retirement for those lucky enough to own properties in the designated region.

All well and good, but maybe not very exciting. Champagne may only cover 34,000 hectares, but within this there are three clearly defined regions and extraordinary differences in terrain, aspect and terroir, not to mention winemaking techniques. The big houses, which we are no longer officially supposed to call Grandes Marques, benefit from economies of scale, most significantly to facilitate sourcing fruit from across the region in an effort to mitigate the marginal climate and sometimes quite localised weather conditions. The consequence of this, of course, has been that consistency has won over diversity. It’s only in the past few years that the growers have developed a self-belief and commercial awareness to start up on their own, to take a road that is far more challenging than merely selling grapes to that persuasive gentleman from Lanson. 

On my annual trips to the BBR satellites in Asia, I have been struck by two possibly somewhat contradictorily messages vis-à-vis champagne. The first is an unassailable passion for the deluxe cuvées, for the best of the best… quite rightly so, given the extraordinary quality that can be achieved by some of these cuvées, despite, in many cases, alleged very high levels of production. Secondly, more interestingly, is the quest for knowledge and a love of detail which can only be fully quenched, over time, by far more familiarity with individual villages and specific plots. Here the Grandes Marques are not in their element, their entire philosophy having been built on an edifice of cross-boundary consistency. This is where the growers come into their own and this is where Champagne’s future lies. BBR held an inaugural growers’ champagne tasting recently, which was very well received. To be able to taste, side by side, wines of such diversity as Paul Bara and Guy Larmandier – the former a hymn to Bouzy pinot noir, the latter a superbly elegant Cramant chardonnay – is to really understand this hitherto undervalued diversity. Add to the equation growers of such consummate skill as Cédric Bouchard from the Aube, Rodolphe Péters from Le Mesnil-sur-Oger and René Geoffroy from Ay and one really gets a sense of what’s possible. The growers are here to stay; they have most definitely all grown up!

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Burgundy Rising


Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd Burgundy director Jasper Morris says the storied French wine region is finally getting a look-in

Burgundy Rising


Master of Wine and Berry Bros & Rudd Burgundy director Jasper Morris says the storied French wine region is finally getting a look-in

Culture > Food & Drink



Burgundy Rising

above illustration: © Berry Bros.

September 25, 2015 / by Jasper Morris / Illustration: Billy Wong

 

In a world with so many exciting wine options, from myriad grape varieties and a host of countries across almost every continent, Bordeaux and Burgundy still reign supreme in both column inches and marketability. I spent the first 20 years of my working life trying to convince wine lovers that Burgundy was a truly exciting option, but most were either focused almost entirely on Bordeaux or demanded cheerful, inexpensive wines. Then, around the millennium, it all began to change.

Burgundy and its charismatic if quixotic grape, pinot noir, began to gain ground. The cult American film Sideways (2004) was more an early symptom of the renewed interest in pinot noir than a cause, but it certainly helped focus interest. Pinot producers all round the world speak of pursuing the Holy Grail. They often say that they make their pinot “in the Burgundy style”, the wretches, which is nonsense as there are nearly as many styles in Burgundy as there are winemakers.

The other cliche you'll often hear is that “Burgundy is a minefield”, which used to be true when there were so few professionally trained winemakers there. You could count on one or two top producers in each village, but nowadays there could be a dozen or more, and probably their cousins too.

I suspect there has been a cultural change in our attitude to good bottles of wine. Previously we wanted certainty, something Bordeaux delivers admirably. If you discover that Château Pontet-Canet 2000 is the wine for you, then there’s a very good chance that pretty much every bottle will deliver what you are expecting. Burgundy has never managed that, which in the past prompted caution among prospective buyers. But the other side of the coin is that every new bottle is a fresh excitement, a chance to continue the voyage of discovery – it is, as ever, the journey that counts.

Meanwhile Bordeaux began to lose friends with over-ambitious pricing for the 2009 and 2010 vintages, another incentive to look elsewhere, throwing Burgundy into the spotlight. Here too prices have been rising for the very top wines as an increasing number of enthusiasts worldwide chase very small production. After 20 years of trying to enthuse consumers about the joys of Burgundy, suddenly demand cannot be met by supply, which could make it a less attractive option.

The learning curve in Asia has been immensely faster than anything one could imagine happening in Europe, with a genuine appreciation of what is in the bottle, emerging quickly. Instead of chasing after legendary names, consumers are becoming more interested in the difference between the taste of one winemaker's vintages compared to his or her neighbour’s, or how a particular vineyard differs from the one across the road.

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A Matter of Taste: Quality Assessment


Learn how to judge a wine’s quality, advises Berry Bros & Rudd’s master of wine and head of education, Anne McHale

A Matter of Taste: Quality Assessment


Learn how to judge a wine’s quality, advises Berry Bros & Rudd’s master of wine and head of education, Anne McHale

Culture > Food & Drink



A Matter of Taste

above illustration: © Berry Bros.

August 28, 2015 / by Anne McHale / Illustration: Billy Wong

 

What is quality in wine? Does it refer to how much you like it, or to a wine’s price, origin or classification? You could argue that since our perceptions of taste are inherently subjective, it is impossible to define.

Break it down, however, and you’ll discover that it's possible to establish a fairly objective assessment of the quality of a wine. To do so, it is important to set aside personal preferences and focus on some of the wine's key components.

Terms often used include complexity, flavour concentration, length and balance. A high-quality wine should boast impressive levels of some or all of these. With practice, it is possible to agree with other wine-lovers on the extent to which each is present. 

Complexity refers to how many types of aroma or flavour are present. A complex wine has many different layers; in a red wine, as well as a primary fruit these would be elements such as earth, leather, tobacco and spice, whereas in a white wine they would be honey, nuts and minerals.

Flavour concentration refers to the intensity of the flavour. Average-quality wines often have pleasant flavours, but typically at dilute concentrations. A larger amount of more concentrated flavours indicates a higher-quality wine. 

Length refers to how long the flavours in a wine linger on the palate after the wine has been swallowed. The flavours of an average wine typically diminish rapidly, whereas you can expect those of a high-quality wine to linger pleasantly, sometimes for as long as several minutes.

Balance in wine can be imagined as a set of scales. On one side is the wine’s concentration of flavour and on the other its structural elements such as acidity, tannins and alcohol. In high-quality wines, the level of flavour concentration will be matched by the structure; neither will dominate.

Wines exhibiting all of the above are usually of high quality. But a wine doesn't necessarily need all of them to be of high quality: typicity – the ability of a wine to accurately display the specific characteristics of a particular grape or region – and longevity can also contribute. Consider a young gewürztraminer, likely to have aromas of lychee and rose and perhaps some minerality, but nowhere near the complexity of, say, a fine 

Gran Reserva Rioja. What it lacks in complexity, however, it makes up for in typicity, expressing the wonderfully floral perfumed notes for which the grape is famous.

Consider also a young red Bordeaux from a top château; it might be somewhat closed aromatically, showing mainly oak and fruit aromas, and its tannins might be somewhat obtrusive, but with tasting experience you will be able to tell that it has immense potential to develop complexity over time.

Quality can be intertwined with many other concepts: brand image, prestige or value for money. But to arrive at the most objective assessment possible, the elements above will take you a long way. Experiment with them and enjoy the learning process.

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Dine Like Xi: Lai Bun Fu


Indulge VIP fare at ex-Government House head chef’s Lai Bun Fu

Dine Like Xi: Lai Bun Fu


Indulge VIP fare at ex-Government House head chef’s Lai Bun Fu

Culture > Food & Drink



Dine Like Xi

July 10, 2015

If you have ever wondered what world leaders eat when they visit our city, you can now taste it for yourself at Hong Kong’s newest fine-dining Chinese restaurant, Lai Bun Fu. Chef Chung Kin Leung’s four-course Saturday brunch menu replicates the specialities he served to VIPs when he was the head chef at Government House. You can select dishes from an à la carte menu, or from a further five specialist menus in addition to the chef’s signature dishes, many of which have graced the plates and bowls of the great and the good. 

Fine wine accompanies fine food and at Lai Bun Fu, for a fixed price, you can enjoy free-flowing Italian Bellavista NV Cuvee Prosecco, or for a little more, Champagne from Delamotte, one of the oldest champagne houses.

The restaurant seats 52 guests, and private dining is available for up to 12 guests in an elegant 2,000sqft venue designed in British-colonial Hong Kong style with a contemporary touch.

Lai Bun Fu 5/F, 18 On Lan Street, Central. Open for lunch and dinner, Monday to Saturday. (laibunfu.com)

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For the Love of Burgundy


Berry Bros & Rudd’s Master of Wine and Burgundy director, Jasper Morris, writes that the growth of global awareness can only bode well for the future of Burgundian wine

For the Love of Burgundy


Berry Bros & Rudd’s Master of Wine and Burgundy director, Jasper Morris, writes that the growth of global awareness can only bode well for the future of Burgundian wine

Culture > Food & Drink



For the Love of Burgundy

above illustration: © Berry Bros.

July 10, 2015 / by Jasper Morris / Illustration: Billy Wong

 

Monsieur “Morin” should be a happy man. His traditional export markets of the US, UK and Japan are all still in love with Burgundy, where he is a respected producer. He’s doing all right in the rest of Europe, especially Scandinavia. And in the last few years he has been beset by requests from Hong Kong, Singapore, Taipei and increasingly China. But he is already sold out and given that he only makes three barrels (900 bottles) of his top wine, how on earth can he divide up his allocations even further?

What’s more, he hasn’t made a full crop since 2009. The years of 2010 and 2011 were both naturally on the small side and several of his vineyards were damaged by hail in 2012, 2013 and 2014. The cost of managing his vineyards in these challenging conditions was higher than usual, the potential revenue from short crops much lower. As he stands at his winery window, gazing out over the main road in contemplative fashion, he wonders how to price his next releases. He has to put the price up to cover his costs, but he doesn’t want to upset his traditional customers either.

There’s a bit of traffic on the road. Monsieur “Perrin” has just flashed past in his latest Lexus. He’s from Vosne-Romanée with a healthy holding of grands crus. There hasn’t been any adverse weather, world demand is enormous, prices are riding high. No worries. Trundling the other way on his vineyard tractor is Morin’s friend André. He comes from Savigny-lès-Beaune where he lost almost his whole crop during the hailstorm of July 23, 2013, as well as suffering in several other recent vintages. He really doesn’t know which way to turn: his bank manager says he needs to double his prices from €8 to €16 a bottle but he will lose all his customers if he does.

Meanwhile China, having perhaps fallen out of love with Bordeaux after the excessive pricing of the 2009 and 2010 vintages, has begun to discover Burgundy. When I first visited Hong Kong (10 years ago) and Shanghai (five years ago) I came across very few sophisticated wine lovers, Domaine de la Romanée-Contiand one or two other producers were on the radar but otherwise awareness levels of this region were low. However the sophistication of understanding has advanced in leaps and bounds every year since then with the emergence of tasting groups and a desire to understand what’s really going on as opposed to what might be a good bet for speculative investment. 

At this year’s Varsity Blind Tasting match (an annual competition between Oxford and Cambridge dating back to 1953) the joint top individual tasters were the Oxford captain Swii Yii Lim and her (unrelated) colleague, Yeechuin Lim. Mind you, this is not an entirely recent phenomenon: in the 1970s Oxford and Cambridge were captained by Kingsley Liu and Raymond Liu respectively.

China has joined the world of wine lovers and China has joined the world of wine producers, though plantings of Burgundy’s beloved pinot noir remain minuscule for the moment. An imbalance in either direction could destabilise the world wine market. The current rapid growth in understanding can only be a good thing.

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No Excuses Needed: Alibi


Langham Place Hotel launches the customed-designed restaurant and bar Alibi

No Excuses Needed: Alibi


Langham Place Hotel launches the customed-designed restaurant and bar Alibi

Culture > Food & Drink



No Excuses Needed

July 10, 2015

Langham Place Hotel in Mong Kok has announced the launch of Alibi, its new restaurant and bar offering shared platters, fine wines and classic cocktails. 

Custom-designed copper pendant lighting set amidst a variety of tribal fabrics and tweed-clad armchairs bring a fresh, modern feel to the new, 140-seat venue that is surprisingly cosy and yet spacious. 

New Zealand chef Tim Bruges is on hand to craft Alibi’s all-day menu which includes seasonal amuse-bouches, iced seafood, charcuterie, cheeses and a selection of desserts for sharing, each using a variety of homegrown, homemade and imported ingredients from Asia, Italy and Spain. 

Behind the bar, home-grown mixologist Leo Cheung offers a dynamic menu of his own handcrafted cocktails reinventing classic flavours.

Open from 8am to 1am, Monday to Thursday, and from 8am to 2am, Friday to Sunday and on public holiday evenings. (langhamhotels.com)

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The Mysterious Mrs Pound


Global burlesque dancer’s disappearance veiled behind a disguised restaurant is said to offer her anonymity

The Mysterious Mrs Pound


Global burlesque dancer’s disappearance veiled behind a disguised restaurant is said to offer her anonymity

Culture > Food & Drink



The Mysterious Mrs Pound

May 29, 2015

Opened so recently Google Street View hasn’t yet caught up, you’d be forgiven for missing the Stamp Shop at 6 Pound Lane off Hollywood Road.  The story of Mrs Pound’s globetrotting burlesque dancing career and disappearance provides the mystery for the disguised restaurant, said to offer her anonymity. At lunchtime the door is open; in the evenings, though, you have to find the hidden button to enter. Within, the fusion menu of Western/Southeast Asian cuisine is accompanied by an extensive drinks menu ranging from beers on draught or bottled, old or new world wines by the glass or bottle and myriad classy cocktails, liqueurs and shorts.  Lunches are all sets at around HK$100 with a minimum requirement of one set per person.  For dinner, choose from the à la carte menu of “skewers”, “smaller”, “bigger”, “salads”, “bar bites” and “sides” - dinner will cost you around HK$200-HK$400 per person. (Note: no bookings for less than six people.) The cosy atmosphere and innovative setting makes Mrs Pound an intriguing venue to explore.

Mrs Pound, 6 Pound Lane, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong, +852 3426 3949  (mrspound.com)

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