201510-fashion5 copy4.jpg
head.jpg
2334785-1949-la-mascotte-du-magazine-elle copy 拷貝.jpg
head.jpg
head2.jpg
Audrey Hepburn, 1955 © Norman Parkinson Ltd.jpg
head.jpg
head1.jpg
head2 copy.jpg
head copy.jpg

Fashion


SCROLL DOWN

Fashion


201510-fashion5 copy4.jpg

Timeless Tuxedos & Signature Sharp Suits


A small street in London that has written itself into fashion history, Savile Row continues to offer a range of suave tailoring choices to the cognoscenti with an eye for tradition

Timeless Tuxedos & Signature Sharp Suits


A small street in London that has written itself into fashion history, Savile Row continues to offer a range of suave tailoring choices to the cognoscenti with an eye for tradition

Style > Fashion


Timeless Tuxedos and Signature Sharp Suits

November 20, 2015 / by Babette Radclyffe

When picturing the archetype of a suave gentleman, it’s hard not to think of Sean Connery as an immaculately attired James Bond sipping a martini, shaken, not stirred – and of course wearing a sharp suit or a timeless tuxedo.

Ian Fleming portrayed his 007 buying his signature suits on one of the most important streets in global fashion history, London’s Savile Row. The Row has not only been a bastion of bespoke tailoring for the past two centuries, but one of its oldest tailors, Henry Poole & Co, also played a leading role in the creation of the tuxedo. The most famous story about the emergence of the tux involves a wealthy tobacco magnate’s son from New York State’s Tuxedo Park, Pierre Lorillard IV. Inspired by a dinner jacket designed by Henry Poole for the Prince of Wales, he decided to do away with the traditional long tailcoat, wearing his new short jacket to the Tuxedo Club’s first annual ball in 1886. Lorillard started a fashion revolution for men’s eveningwear and the tuxedo soon became a classic, the name of the small village where it made its debut famous the world over.  

Savile Row continues to serve tasteful tailoring to discerning gentlemen. Housed at arguably the most prestigious address at No.1, Gieves & Hawkes offers a autumn/winter collection full of rich textures and a sophisticated colour palette, perfectly embodying the trend of understated luxury. Another Savile Row icon, Dege & Skinner, draws on its 150-year heritage to produce a range of traditional tuxedos as well as beautiful velvet smoking jackets, fit for any gentlemen’s club.   

Alexander McQueen also worked on Savile Row, notoriously sewing profanities into the lining of a jacket destined for Prince Charles, and the menswear brand that bears his name continues to offer quirky alternatives to classic evening wear with items such as knotted skull cufflinks with crystal eye details.

No eveningwear ensemble would be complete without a fine timepiece and a pair of slick shoes. FP Journe, with a reputation for creating complex horological creations, is the only watchmaker to make its movements in 18-karat rose gold, and its Chronometre Souverain and Grand Sonnerie watches are the ideal evening wrist accompaniments. Santoni’s luxury leather shoes, completely handmade by Italian artisans, run the gamut from the classic to the innovative, and are the perfect way to complete the 007 look.

Images: courtesy of Philip Plein, F.P.Journe, Dege & Skinner, Alexander McQueen; credit: Santoni; Daniel Craig:Casino Royale ©2006 Danjaq, LLC and United Artists Corporation and Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc; Sean Connery:Dr No ©1962 Danjaq, LLC and United Artists Corporation. 

head.jpg

Anything Goes: AW15 Trends


With everything from gothic glam to geek chic, there are few rules this season

Anything Goes: AW15 Trends


With everything from gothic glam to geek chic, there are few rules this season

Style > Fashion



Anything Goes

August 28, 2015 / by Babette Radclyffe

With female models starring in menswear shows earlier this year, and womenswear design details taking the menswear collections this season by storm, the genderless look is fast appearing as a contender for the future of fashion. From kaleidoscopic prints and ’70s shearling to Victoriana and geek chic, here is the lowdown on the key trends for both womenswear and menswear this autumn-winter season.

Last season’s key ’70s trend is here to stay as this season's womenswear collections took a folky turn. Valentino showcased floor-length patchwork fur jackets and continued the theme with delicate, high-collared dresses covered in multi-coloured lace. Derek Zoolander and Hansel, AKA Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson of cult fashion film Zoolander even made an appearance, closing the Valentino runway with their best Blue Steel poses.

Lanvin’s sweeping gowns were paired with fur-trimmed gilets, jackets and plenty of tassels. Chloé’s patchwork poncho perfectly embodied the trend in a collection full of floating boho-babe gowns.

Read More

Balmain's collection mined another decade for its inspiration. Balmain’s models, who read like a who’s who of the hottest names around, took to the catwalks in a collection full of ’80s bright hues, one-shouldered dresses, layers of ruffles and huge waist belts.

Vivid colours and bold prints continued to splash across both womenswear and menswear catwalks. Christian Dior presented a plethora of prints, showing abstract animal prints paired with thigh-high uber-sexy vinyl boots as well as print-covered bodycon suits. Animal prints made an appearance in Burberry Prorsum men’s collection, which was also a playground of paisley. Prints also took pride of place in its womenswear collection, a carnival of colour aptly named Patchwork, Pattern and Prints. London fash pack darling Christopher Kane used striking scarlet and cobalt blue velvet naked silhouettes, while checks appeared as key patterns for menswear this season too: subtle squares were seen at Salvatore Ferragamo men and Giorgio Armani, where models took the runway as couples.

The top texture this season was a feel-me fluffiness, seen across womenswear and menswear collections. Models were nearly engulfed by fuzz, such as Louis Vuitton’s huge brushed-sheepskin coats, which opened a stellar women’s show, and Stella McCartney’s “fur-free fur” coats made snuggly look stylish. 

A distinctly ’70s shearling appeared on catwalks from London to Milan, such as in Sonia Rykiel’s shearling-lined navy pea coat. It took a shorter turn for menswear, with waist-length versions seen at Valentino, Fendi and Jil Sander.

A stark contrast from the fluffiness was the sombre look of Victoriana. 

Alexander McQueen’s women’s collection took a darkly romantic twist with an Edward Scissorhands vibe, closing the collection with a distressed lace gown. Thom Browne’s collection might have been inspired by the exhibition of Victorian mourning clothes Death Becomes Her but the collection was full of contemporary-cool pieces such as a zippered mini-skirt paired with Chelsea boots. Givenchy’s sombrely seductive collection with eye-catching facial jewellery and baby curls was reminiscent of fashion’s It girl of the moment, musician FKA Twigs, and featured exquisitely made corsetry, velvets and contemporary tailoring.

A 180˚ turn from gothic glam saw the emergence of the girl of Wes Anderson’s dreams. A Margot Tenenbaum-inspired glamourous geek took to the runways at Gucci with new head designer 

Alessandro Michele at the helm, while Prada’s pastel-coloured collection included cutesy two-piece suits, ponytails and kitsch jewellery. Burberry Prorsum’s spectacle-clad male models had a bookish charm and Sonia Rykiel added a normcore spin to a metallic mini-dress by layering it on top of a polo-neck. 

Polo-necks were also a key item in menswear collections. Seen paired with both urban tailoring and sport luxe-inspired garb at Hermès and Berluti, polo-necks were a basic item for this season’s key trend of layering, with layers draped, piled up and wrapped, and a mid-layer even introduced by Givenchy. Coats came in couples at Lanvin and Dries Van Noten, who layered two coats and a kilt on top of trousers.

Men's outerwear also went into the wild, with animal print leaving the jungle and running wild across the catwalks. Saint Laurent paired zebra-print coats with skin-tight leather trousers, while Calvin Klein Collection took a more subtle approach with grey hues.

Gender neutrality emerged as a key trend for menswear, with JW Anderson using cuffs from his womenswear collections to adorn men’s shirts, Gucci playing with delicate bows on crimson blouses for men and Rick Owens’ models wearing notoriously revealing draped tunics. Whether its ’70s boho, gothic glam or geek chic, trends are crossing gender lines and fashion is embracing gender fluidity this season.

From left to right, Womenswear AW15: Givenchy, Lanvin, Valentino, Gucci, Balmain; Menswear AW15: Valentino, Gucci, Givenchy, Calvin Klein Collection


2334785-1949-la-mascotte-du-magazine-elle copy 拷貝.jpg

...And God Created Woman: Brigitte Bardot


Brigitte Bardot and the groundbreaking Vichy dress

...And God Created Woman: Brigitte Bardot


Brigitte Bardot and the groundbreaking Vichy dress

Style > Fashion



...And God Created Woman

August 28, 2015 / by Scarlett Thomas

Bombshell beauty Brigitte Bardot is without doubt one of the most enduring sex symbols of the ’50s and ’60s. A talented actress, singer and model, Brigitte Bardot, AKA BB, not only symbolised the youthful, liberated beauty of post-war France but also made a stylish mark on global fashion. The curvaceous star’s most iconic outfit, her Vichy wedding dress by designer Jacques Esterel, gave the Vichy dress an international fashion platform and spurred countless imitations. Produced in Europe since the 18th century, the Vichy dress, made of a material popularly known as gingham, got its first notable silver-screen outing in 1939 when Judy Garland, as Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, with adorable pigtails and toy dog Toto to match, wore an iconic gingham dress in blue and white as she skipped across the big screen. Two decades later in the balmy summer of ’59, Bardot chose a pink and white gingham dress with lace trim to wed her actor beau Jacques Charrier.

Bardot’s choice of such a summery, youthful dress, in contrast to traditional structured white gowns, was ground-breaking; gingham has since been used to adorn countless garments, often in a tricolour of hues. Pay homage to one of the greats of French cinema and global beauty by opting for gingham.

Back to top

head.jpg

Align for Summer: The Hottest Trends


Stripes reign supreme this season 

 

Align for Summer: The Hottest Trends


Stripes reign supreme this season 

 

Style > Fashion



Align for Summer

July 10, 2015 / by Babette Radclyffe

Horizontal, vertical or diagonal stripes are here in any and every way you could want this season. As bold brushstrokes of colour at Paul Smith or in mature monochrome at Edun, statement stripes are demanding a place in your wardrobe this summer. 

Both high-energy horizontal and vivacious vertical came out to play at DKNY. Fashion-forward silhouettes showed in a multitude of sports-luxe inspired fabrics and textures, as stripes in a kaleidoscope of colours ran the gamut from layered knit tube skirts to bold crop tops.

Prince of prints Peter Pilotto heralded the return of the stripe in a signature bright and pattern-heavy collection. Models paired A-line dresses and skirts in a carnival of colours with minimalist natural makeup – letting the clothes do all the talking. 

Stripes appeared bold and skinny, and in a plethora of shades and sizes at Uma Wang. The collection was full of slouchy silhouettes, drawing inspiration from the luxe loungewear trend, and creating an overall effect of effortless glam. 

Read More

Stripes and Paul Smith fit together like Paul Smith and stripes, and this collection saw tangerine and teal horizontal declensions played across loosely fitted slips, boxy t-shirts and dropped hem dresses. Menswear tailoring influences swept through the collection, too, with wide pinstripe blazers and cropped trousers in mellower shades.

Stripes even extended to the catwalk itself at Carven, where models powered down the runway wearing bold stripes inspired by Formula One racing and Japanese graphics. 

Stripes took a more subtle turn at Edun with monochromatic stripe trims adorning a range of boxy judo-uniform inspired silhouettes. Bands of pattern appeared throughout the collection, which at first glance resembled a vibrant hue of animal print, but were in reality inspired by Ivory Coast tribes whose dot-covered kponyungo masks ward off evil spirits. 

Adorning monotone shirt dresses and overcoats paired with striking silver trousers, stripes took a fresh yet sexy turn on the Altuzarra woman. Nicolas Ghesquière continued the minimalist mood at Louis Vuitton, expertly and intricately piecing together strips of leather in a range of jackets, slip dresses and mid-thigh skirts. 

The stripes at Chanel sported a nautical air. Supermodel extraordinaire Gisele Bündchen put the sexy back into sweater dresses as only she could with iterations in blue, white and tan that she paraded on the catwalk.

Marinière stripes abounded at Philipp Plein too as retro-inspired crinoline dresses opened a playful collection. Plein showed the stripe’s versatility as rhinestone embellished varietals adorned black skinny jeans along with boxy tops paired with puffball skirts. 

Look to stripes as fashion’s shared code this summer: monotone, marinière and multi-coloured, there’s something for everyone who loves all the right lines.

1, 2. Philipp Plein SS15
3. Altuzarra SS15
4. DKNY SS15
5. Louis Vuitton SS15
6. Carven SS15
7. Paul Smith SS15


head2.jpg

Aye Aye Captain: Nautical Menswear


Set sail this summer with the latest trends for men

Aye Aye Captain: Nautical Menswear


Set sail this summer with the latest trends for men

Style > Fashion



Aye Aye Captain

July 10, 2015 / by Babette Radclyffe

From Breton stripes to striking slickers, channel your inner pirate, captain, voyager or beach lounger with this season’s silhouette of nautical-themed menswear, and our roundup of go-to maritime-inspired regalia. 

Designers took to the seas for inspiration by turning to those navigators of stormy seas to create collections for much calmer waters. 

It was full steam ahead on luxurious decks at Gucci, with a sharp collection in tricolour hues. Navy and white nautical stripes adorned casual shirts, luxe suiting and even boating blazers, while crisp white shirts and jackets with epaulettes took centre stage. Insignia made bold declarations on knitwear and showed subtly on the breast pockets of more formal tailored pieces. 

Thick or skinny, Breton or beguiling, seafaring stripes coursed every which way at Dior Homme. Working sailors were referenced with yellow slickers that punctuated the collection, while quirky toggle fastenings embellished suave tuxedos. Navy and white were the key tones throughout, with occasional bursts of outerwear in maraschino and citrus.

Patrick Grant at E. Tautz took Brits at the beach as his starting point for a collection which pushed the boundaries of traditional tailoring with up-to-date profiles. Statement navy and white deckchair stripes ran through the whole collection, on wide-legged trousers, across knitwear and on boxy tees. And not straying too far from the realities of perennially capricious British summertime, layers and mackintoshes were central to the collection.

The theme took a turn into a separate genre at Louis Vuitton, with a menswear collection inspired by designer Kim Jones’ travels in India and imbued with subtle Air Force references. MA-1 flight jackets came in classic olive green as well as a terrific tangerine. Air went surface later with jumpsuits, another dominant design in the collection, coming in a nautical navy with metallic detailing as well as a striking hot pink. 

So, be you poolside, beach-bound, or high-seas adventuring this summer, be sure to get on board with a pitch-perfect maritime ensemble.

1, 2. E. Tautz SS15
3, 4. Gucci 2015 Fashion Show Men’s Look
5, 6. Louis Vuitton SS15

Audrey Hepburn, 1955 © Norman Parkinson Ltd.jpg

Forever Audrey: Hepburn’s Enduring Legacy


What every woman wants: Audrey Hepburn and the making of her legendary 20th-century silhouette

Forever Audrey: Hepburn’s Enduring Legacy


What every woman wants: Audrey Hepburn and the making of her legendary 20th-century silhouette

Style > Fashion



Forever Audrey

Above image: Audrey Hepburn, 1955 © Norman Parkinson Ltd

July 10, 2015 / by Jean-Marc Zheng

 

“The imprint of Miss Hepburn is absolutely, totally present. Like it or not, she will be the most important look of the 20th century”

Audrey Hepburn How to Steal a Million

Audrey Hepburn How to Steal a Million

In a career that saw him shoot for Harper’s Bazaar and Hollywood studios taking “on-set” promotional stills as a “unit photographer”, American cameraman Bob Willoughby was famous for his shots of Elizabeth Taylor, Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland and Jane Fonda. But, there was one lady, Edda van Heemstra Hepburn-Ruston, otherwise known as Audrey Hepburn, who was peerless. 

Asked to photograph the rising starlet one morning for a routine portrait shoot after her arrival in Hollywood in 1953, Willoughby later recalled the feeling of meeting Hepburn for the first time. “She took my hand like… well, a princess, and dazzled me with that smile that God designed to melt mortal men’s hearts.”

And cinematic and stylistic hearts too. The Belgian-born beauty (1929), daughter of a Dutch baroness and an Anglo-Irish banker, with her gamine hair cut, flat ballet shoes, turtlenecks, dresses and portfolio of classic handbags, silhouetted her way through films such as Roman Holiday, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Sabrina and My Fair Lady, to become the go-to fashion blueprint for women worldwide. It wasn’t her frame – 34A-20-34 – women wanted, so much as the dress sense she put on it, and her face.

“The imprint of Miss Hepburn is absolutely, totally present. Like it or not, she will be the most important look of the 20th century,” said shoe designer Manolo Blahnik in the late ’90s. 

Read More

Audrey Hepburn in Richmond Park by Bert Hardy

Audrey Hepburn in Richmond Park by Bert Hardy

Anthony Beauchamp, a photographer who captured Hepburn early in her career during a 1950 fashion shoot for a department store in England, was beguiled by her: 

“I couldn’t quite fathom that she was real. There were so many paradoxes in that face. Darkness and purity, depth and youth, stillness and animation. She had a fresh new look, a beauty that was ethereal.” Hepburn became one of the world’s most photographed women, and in May, Getty Images revealed that its most requested photographic subject over the last 20 years was Audrey Hepburn.

All of which makes it something of a cultural moment when Audrey Hepburn: Portraits of an Icon, 35 photographs of Hepburn from her sons’ personal collection, goes on display at London’s National Portrait Gallery from July until October 18.

 Among the rare finds, some of which have never previously been shown in public, is Hepburn performing a 1942 dance recital, aged 13, and a shot of her taken on location in Africa during the 1958 filming of The Nun’s Story by Leo Fuchs. There’s also a behind the scenes shot of Hepburn being fitted-out in an Edith Head costume for her role in Sabrina

Audrey Hepburn by Philippe Halsman

Audrey Hepburn by Philippe Halsman

Hepburn moved to London from Amsterdam to take up a ballet scholarship at the Rambert Ballet School, in Notting Hill in late 1948. After a number of important stage performances as a chorus girl in the West End, Hepburn made her earliest film debuts in British films. Her critically acclaimed stage performance in Gigi (1951) introduced Hepburn to American theatre audiences and confirmed her position as a new star. Throughout the ’50s and ’60s, Hepburn’s career flourished with a string of highly successful roles, and she became the first actress to win Academy and BAFTA Awards as well as a Golden Globe, for a single performance,  her leading role in Roman Holiday (1953). Hepburn worked as a UNICEF ambassador from 1988 until her death in 1993 and in 1992 was awarded the US Presidential Medal of Freedom in recognition of her contribution to the arts, and her humanitarian work.

“Style is a word we use often and for a multitude of purposes. In the case of my mother, Audrey Hepburn, it was the extension of an inner beauty held up by a life of discipline, respect for the other and hope in humanity. If the lines were pure and elegant it was because she believed in the power of simplicity. If there was timelessness it was because she believed in quality and if she is still an icon of style today, it is because once she found her look she stayed with it throughout her life. She didn’t go with the trends, didn’t reinvent herself every season,” says her son Sean H. Ferrer. 

National Portrait Gallery deputy director Pim Baxter says:

“Audrey Hepburn was one of the world’s most celebrated actresses, and I am delighted that the National Portrait Gallery will hold a major photography exhibition exploring the life and work of such a significant and much-loved figure who spent the formative early years of her career in Britain. It is particularly appropriate that the exhibition will be staged in such close proximity to where she performed as a young woman at the very start of her career.”

There’s only one matter shoe legend Blahnik couldn’t have anticipated; it’s now 2015, and Hepburn is still the dominant aesthetic fashion presence of the 21st century. (npg.org.uk/hepburn)

Back to top

head.jpg

LBD: The Little Black Dress


LBD: The Little Black Dress


Style > Fashion



LBD: The Little Black Dress

Above photo: © Inaginechina

July 10, 2015 / by Bei Li

The little black dress or “LBD” is often considered the must-have item for any woman’s wardrobe. The definitive go-to, fail safe choice for an effortlessly elegant look that can take you from work to cocktails, dinner parties and social events the world over, where did this magical little black number come from?

Black dresses were considered unsuitable for fashionable wear due to their long association with mourning dress. Queen Victoria wore black for nearly 40 years following Prince Albert’s death in 1861. In the mid ’20s ground-breaking designer Gabrielle Chanel turned that notion on its head with the introduction of her, now classic, LBD. 

Chanel’s LBD drew comparisons with Ford’s Model T car; providing a pure and practical design solution which could be reinterpreted for a mass market as well as appealing to the fashion elite. Although Chanel introduced the LBD into the modern fashion lexicography, probably the most iconic image of the LBD remains Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly adorned in pearls and a Givenchy LBD gazing into Tiffany’s windows in cult classic Breakfast at Tiffany’s, a fashion moment frozen in time which propelled the LBD further into fashion lore and its place at the heart of women’s wardrobes.

Image on the right: © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP Paris 2014

Back to top


head1.jpg

Fringe Benefits


We look at the season’s key womenswear trend: fringing

Fringe Benefits


We look at the season’s key womenswear trend: fringing

Style > Fashion



Fringe Benefits

May 29, 2015 / by Babette Radclyffe

A nostalgic nod to the decade which brought us style icons from the Navajo-clad Cher, to supermodel extraordinaire Jerry Hall with her endless-legs and on to hippy delight singer Kate Bush, retro chic dominated the catwalks this season.  From Gucci and Louis Vuitton to Proenza Schouler and The Row, this season designers are turning to the 70s for inspiration, and fringing is fast becoming the definitive design takeaway. 

No longer relegated to the dressing-up box, powerhouse model Kendall Jenner and her equally famous gal pack brought fringing up to date at the Coachella music festival.  From subtle hints to full-on fringing, we round up the perfect pieces for this season. With small trickles appearing in autumn/winter 2014 adorning accessories or small detailing such as Just Cavalli’s pre-autumn 2014 fringed handbags matched with tasselled scarves, the surge of fringing is now upon us. 

Proenza Schouler’s floor-sweeping, thigh-high slit, unravelling fringed dresses added a bohemian edge to evening wear and are guaranteed to make an entrance – with statement waist-high slits for the more adventurous.  

Fringing even made an appearance in their accessories with a leather-fringed pair of gold heels, perfect for that subtle touch. Preen by Thornton Bregazzi’s mini-dresses and crop tops saw a rainbow of fringing with a hint of inspiration from golf stripes, giving a more sport-luxe feel to the collection.

The 70s influence extended to the models at Sonia Rykiel as the offspring of famous 70s icons swooshed down the catwalk with Georgia May and Lizzy Jagger following in their leggy mother’s footsteps modelling for the label. Models swished down the catwalk in bright white and classic camouflage-coloured knee-length fringed skirts paired with cropped jumpers and elegant knitwear.

Extreme fringes appeared in resort wear too as DKNY’s faux leather jacket called out to the inner rock chick. Other labels kept the fringing more subtle such as J.Crew Collection’s peach fringe sweater, and Burberry Prorsum’s form-fitting, fringed knitted midi skirt. Theory’s fringe-fronted sleeveless top in monotone shades is perfect for taking the trend into the office.

Accessories received their fair share too, such as Isabel Marant’s fringe mesh necklace and Charlotte Olympia’s suede kitty-faced pouch. Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen of luxury line The Row introduced a fringed woven statement bag with leather tassels to boot and while Marni’s fringed clutch bag might not have as much fringing, it definitely still makes an impact.

So whether you have Coachella freshly under your belt, or you’re leaving the mud to the teens, there’s festive spirit for everyone this summer thanks to fringing.

head2 copy.jpg

Game On: Sports Luxe


Men start the summer with a new active silhouette

Game On: Sports Luxe


Men start the summer with a new active silhouette

Style > Fashion



Game On: Sports Luxe

May 29, 2015 / by Babette Radclyffe

Menswear is taking to the tracks and the Calvin Klein Collection hit a home run this season with a collection dominated by sports luxe looks - where loosely tailored trousers were paired with high-tops. The sports luxe trend has been on the fashion radar for the last couple of seasons and this showing marks its transition to a wardrobe staple. At Calvin Klein muscular male models wore layered T-shirts and vests, in fresh peach and apricot shades.  Tailored shorts were layered over skintight cycle shorts and paired with matching blazers. 

The audience sat ringside as Moncler Gamme Bleu brought the boxing ring to the fashion runway. Moncler’s ‘fashletes’ wore plaid menswear staples including suits, jackets, coats and shorts but gave them an athletic edge with knee-high socks and boxing boots. Boxing robes draped over plaid suits illustrate this season’s sports luxe melange of tailoring and sportswear. The French brand used a patriotic colour palette of red, which offset the monotone plaids, with models sporting NFL-style eye-black in the Tricolour hues. 

Bold player numbers were emblazoned on sports singlets at John Richmond in a season that saw singlets rapidly become a must-have item and key player. The athletic tempo was picked up by Dirk Bikkembergs whose models even carried bicycles down the catwalk. Blazers were paired with neoprene trousers and Italian triathlete Daniel Hofer closed the show with a jog around the catwalk. 

Balmain’s collection celebrated a sports luxe classic with their stylish leather joggers and detailed leather jackets paired with slouchy tracksuit bottoms.  Relaxed tailoring was a key look at Fendi as models wore tailored trousers with baseball jackets and slip-on shoes. 

Sports luxe took a more wistful turn at Dries Van Noten whose collection was inspired by revered ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev. Ballet inspired details featured throughout the collection with flowing coats, and trousers with elasticated waistbands. Baseball jackets punctuated the collection and models wore shoes that mimicked classic ballet slippers.

With roots in hip-hop styling and high-tech performance wear, sportswear is no longer relegated to the gym and stands proud on the podium of menswear.

head copy.jpg

Time is Money at Baselworld


The Billionaire by Jacob & Co: a model to watch

Time is Money at Baselworld


The Billionaire by Jacob & Co: a model to watch

Style > Fashion



Time is Money at Baselworld

May 29, 2015

 

Russian-born watchmaker Jacob Arabo is hardly the shy and retiring type when measured against his Swiss watchmaking peers. Known as the king of bling – rapper P. Diddy features his watches in his music videos and Jay Z christened him ‘Jacob the Jeweller’ in song – Arabo glamourises the gaudy and his grandiose watches are worn by a glittering array of A-list celebrity, from Karl Lagerfeld to Victoria Beckham and Justin Bieber. 

Lagerfeld buys Arabo’s watches from fashion forward boutique Colette in Paris and rewards his staff with them as presents, while footballer Cristiano Ronaldo is the current brand ambassador. 

Little wonder then that Arabo’s firm, New York-based Jacob & Co, unveiled five unique horological models at this year’s Baselworld International Watch & Jewelry Fair in March, one of which was the far from bashful ‘Billionaire’. 

While not indicative of its monetary value, which equates to US$18.3 million, this one-of-a-kind watch reflects a collaborative endeavour between Arabo and storied Italian entrepreneur and fashion magnate, Flavio Briatore’s Billionaire Lifestyle. 

Measuring an imposing 58mm by 475mm, the Billionaire skeleton timepiece boasts a case and bracelet set with 260 carats of GIA Certified emerald-cut diamonds, featuring individual gems weighing up to three carats. Each diamond is mounted in an 18K white gold bead setting, highlighting its brilliance. 

It’s classic Arabo. The watch gallantly revives subtle nuances of 1920s jewellery arts while reveling in the technical advances of contemporary watchmaking. Briatore, meanwhile, is celebrated as a leader in the luxury realm for both his strong management background in Formula One racing, and his role as founder of Billionaire Italian couture. 

The two say the Billionaire manifests their shared devotion to supreme quality and a tradition of adventurous trendsetting in the luxury sector. 

“I am thrilled to announce the partnership between Jacob & Co and Flavio Briatore,” said Arabo at the Swiss fair. “Mr. Briatore’s dynamic successes in the world of luxury align with the values of innovation, and incomparable quality that we seek to demonstrate through our work.” 

A sentiment evidently shared by fair-goers. An order was placed on the watch though the identity of the potential buyer wasn’t revealed and Jacob & Co spoke of an inquiry for a second bespoke Billionaire model from a private client. 

Heady times for Arabo, and the bling ring shows no sign of stopping.